Schedule

05 April

06 April

07 April

05 April

06 April

07 April

Speakers

Sponsors

Exhibitors

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Richard Jackson, MD, MPH

Professor
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Richard Jackson, MD, MPH is a Professor at the Fielding School of Public Health at the University of California, Los Angeles. A pediatrician, he has served in many leadership positions in both environmental health and infectious disease with the California Health Department, including the highest as the State Health Officer. For nine years he was Director of the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health in Atlanta. In October, 2011 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.
While in California he was instrumental in conceptualizing laws to reduce risks from pesticides, especially to farm workers and to children. While at CDC he was a national and international leader, including leading the federal effort to “biomonitor” chemical levels in the US population. Dick Jackson co-authored two Island Press Books: Urban Sprawl and Public Health in 2004 and Making Healthy Places in 2011. He is host of a 2012 public television series Designing Healthy Communities which links to the J Wiley & Sons book by the same name. He is an elected honorary member of both the American Institute of Architects and the American Society of Landscape Architects.

05 April

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Joshua Sharfstein, MD

Associate Dean, Public Health Practice & Training
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Joshua Sharfstein, MD oversees the Office of Public Health Practice and Training, the General Preventive Medicine Residency and major practice activities, including collaboration with public health agencies. He is also the inaugural Professor of the Practice in the Department of Health Policy and Management.
Previously, he served as the Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Principal Deputy Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Commissioner of Health for Baltimore City, and as health policy advisor for Congressman Henry A. Waxman.

06 April

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Matthew W. Gillman, MD, SM

Director
NIH Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program
Matthew W. Gillman, MD, SM joined the National Institutes of Health on July 5, 2016 as the director of the Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program. Dr. Gillman came to NIH from Harvard Medical School where he was a professor of population medicine and a professor of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health.
His background is in the fields of epidemiology, pediatrics, and internal medicine. He has extensive experience leading the types of clinical and population-based studies that ECHO comprises, having served as an investigator on several large, high-profile studies.

07 April

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Nsedu Obot Witherspoon, MPH

Executive Director
Children's Environmental Health Network

05 April

07 April

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James R. Roberts, MD, MPH

Professor
Medical University of South Caroline
OS-3: Will Rising Herbicide Use in the Midwest Raise Reproductive Risks?

Presentation title: Introductions and announcement of project launch

05 April

06 April

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Charles Benbrook,PhD

Consultant
Benbrook Consulting Services
OS-3: Will Rising Herbicide Use in the Midwest Raise Reproductive Risks?
Session Chair

Presentation title: Trends in Herbicide Use and Exposures

06 April

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AZ

Ami Zota,ScD,MS

Assistant Professor
Milken School of Public Health, George Washington University
OS-1: Novel methods for examining cumulative chemical exposures during pregnancy
Session Chair

Presentation title: Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) and OH-PBDE concentrations in maternal serum, fetal liver, and placenta, and associations with fetal cytochrome P450 gene expression

06 April

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Linda A. McCauley,PhD,RN,FAAN,FAAOHN

Dean, Professor, and Children's Environmental Health Center Dual PI
Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
OS-7: Maternal-Child Health, the Environment, and the Microbiome
Session Chair

07 April

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TW

Tracey J. Woodruff,PhD,MPH

Director of the Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment Professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences University of California, San Francisco
OS-1: Novel methods for examining cumulative chemical exposures during pregnancy

Presentation title: Novel Chemicals Identified in Pregnant Women in Northern California using Non-targeted Analysis

OS-8: Making science-based decisions in children's environmental health
Session Chair

Presentation title: Systematic review in the environmental health sciences: history and future

06 April

07 April

07 April

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Cynthia F. Bearer,MD,PhD,FAAP

Mary Gray CobeyProfessor of Neonatology; Associate Chair for Research; Editor-in-Chief, Pediatric Research
University of Maryland School of Medicine; International Pediatric Research Foundation
CEHN 2017 Conference Advisory Committee
Co-Chair

OS-5: Environmental Influences on Brain Development
Chair


06 April

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MB

Martha Berger,MPA

Program Analyst, Office of Children's Health Protection, USEPA
NIEHS National Toxicology Program
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Polly Hoppin,ScD

Resarch Professor/Program Director
College of Health Sciences/Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
OS-4: Early Life Exposures and Cancer: Science and Systems Change
Session Chair

Presentation title: Advancing a Primary Prevention Agenda for Cancer: Systems Change to Drive Exposure Reduction in Early Life

06 April

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SM

Suril Mehta, MPH

Doctural Student
Milken School of Public Health, George Washington University
OS-1: Novel methods for examining cumulative chemical exposures during pregnancy

Presentation title: Co-exposure to multiple persistent endocrine disruptors during pregnancy in a ethnically diverse California overweight cohort

OS-6: Elimination of childhood lead poisoning: a renewed federal strategy 

Presentation title: Current status of harmful lead exposure and its associated health effects in the US

06 April

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CS

Clara G. Sears,MS

University of Louisville, School of Public Health and Information Sciences
COS-4: Heavy Metals

Presentation title: Health of children living near coal ash

07 April

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EK

Elaina M. Kenyon,PhD,DABT

Research Toxicologist
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
COS-2: Hot Topics in Children's Environmental Health

Presentation title: Scaling Factor Variability and Toxicokinetic Outcomes in Children

06 April

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EH

Eunha Hoh,PhD,MS

Associate Professor
School of Public Health, San Diego State University
COS-3: Persistent organic pollutants & Plastic Additives 

Presentation title: Persistent organic pollutants in breast milk and dietary history

07 April

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ES

Eva J. Sugeng,MSc

Health and Life Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
COS-3: Persistent organic pollutants & Plastic Additives

Presentation title: Toddlers’ exposure to Brominated and Phosphorus Flame Retardants

07 April

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JB

Jamie L Banks,PhD,MS

Executive Director
Quiet Communities, Inc.
COS-2: Hot Topics in Children's Environmental Health

Presentation title: Landscape Maintenance Equipment Emissions and Children’s Health

06 April

06 April

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JC

Jason Coates

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JR

Jennifer D. Roberts,DrPH,MPH

Assistant Professor
University of Maryland College Park
COS-1: Health Disparities

Presentation title: Is sitting the new smoking for Washington DC area youth?

06 April

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JA

Jessica Ann Timms

Research Assistant
Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University
COS-2: Hot Topics in Children's Environmental Health

Presentation title: DNA methylation as a mediator of in utero exposures on risk of ALL

06 April

06 April

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JJ

Jill Johnston,PhD

Assistant Professor
University of Southern California
COS-4: Heavy Metals

Presentation title: Community-driven methods to evaluate exposures from a lead smelter

07 April

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JO

Joshua Olufemi Ojo

Professor
Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria
COS-4: Heavy Metals

Presentation title: Exposure of Breastfed Infants to Pb, Hg, and Se in Nigeria
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KZ

Kristina M. Zierold,PhD,MS

Associate Professor
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, School of Public Health, University of Louisville
COS-4: Heavy Metals

Presentation title: Fly Ash Exposure and Social Competence in Children Aged 6 to 14

07 April

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ED

Elmer Diaz,MS

Toxicologist
Office of Environmental Public Health Sciences Washington State Department of Health
COS-3: Persistent organic pollutants & Plastic Additives

Presentation title: Identifying water sources at risk of Per- and Polyfluroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination in Washington

07 April

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MS

Manthan Shah,PhD,MPH

Rutgers School of Public Health; and Office of Children's Health Protection, EPA
COS-4: Heavy Metals

Presentation title: Lead Content of Sindoor, a Hindu Religious Powder and Cosmetic

OS-6: Elimination of childhood lead poisoning: a renewed federal strategy 
Session Chair

06 April

07 April

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PQ

Penelope J.E Quintana,PhD,MPH

Professor
San Diego State University Graduate School of Public Health
COS-1: Health Disparities 

Presentation title: Thirdhand smoke contamination in low-income housing

06 April

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SB

Stacy Buckingham-Howes,PhD

Research Associate
University of Maryland School of Medicine
COS-1: Health Disparities

Presentation title: Domoic Acid Neurotoxicity in Native American Children

06 April

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LQ

Lesliam Quiros-Alcala,PhD,MS

Assistant Professor
University of Maryland
COS-1: Health Disparities

Presentation title: Parabens and Asthma Morbidity in Children with Asthma NHANES (2005-10)

06 April

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RF

Richard H. Finnell,PhD

Professor
University of Texas
COS-2: Hot Topics in Children's Environmental Health

Presentation title: Autoimmunity and Spina Bifida—Identification of Maternal Serum Biomarkers Associated with Neural Tube Defects

06 April

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SG

Symielle A. Gaston,PhD,MPH

ORISE/US Environmental Protection Agency
COS-3: Persistent organic pollutants & Plastic Additives

Presentation title: Phthalates and metabolic syndrome in U.S. adolescents (NHANES 2003-10)

07 April

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AF

Ann Ferrero

06 April

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Kevin Chan

06 April

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EM

Elizabeth M.S. O'Nan

06 April

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ES

Emily Szwiec

06 April

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HW

Haguerenesh Woldeyohannes

06 April

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JP

Janet A. Phoenix,MD,MPH

Assistant Research Professor
George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health
COS-1: Health Disparities

Presentation title: Amerihealth Tablet Project: Reducing Asthma ER Visits

06 April

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KR

Karin Russ

06 April

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KH

Kathleen Hibbert,PhD

06 April

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Kimberly Hazard

Project Coordinator
University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing, California Childcare Health Program
COS-2: Hot Topics in Children's Environmental Health

Presentation title: Reducing exposure to pesticides in California family child care homes

06 April

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KP

Kristi Pettibone

06 April

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LT

Lindsay Koloff Tompkins,MS

06 April

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Nilla Barros,PhD

06 April

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RS

Ratchaneewan Sinitkul,MD

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University
COS-4: Heavy Metals

Presentation title: The biomonitoring and health outcome of students in gold-mine vicinity

07 April

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YW

Yi-Ru Wang

06 April

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Laura Romano,MPH

Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, George Washington University Milken School of Public Health
COS-3: Persistent organic pollutants & Plastic Additives

Presentation title: Prenatal EDC exposures and biomarkers of the chronic stress response

07 April

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SP

Surili Patel

Senior Program Manager, Environmental Health
American Public Health Association
COS-2: Hot Topics in Children's Environmental Health

Presentation title: Environmental Public Health Systems: Protecting Health of All Children

06 April

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VW

Vickie R. Walker

Health Scientist, Office of Health Assessment and Translation
National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
OS-8: Making Science-based Decisions in Children's Environmental Health

Presentation title: Systematic review in the environmental health sciences: history and future

07 April

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MP

Melissa Perry,ScD,MHS

George Washington University

06 April

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JV

Julia R. Varshavsky,MPH

Doctoral Student
School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley
OS-1: Novel methods for examining cumulative chemical exposures during pregnancy

Presentation title: A novel method for calculating potency weighted cumulative phthalates exposure with implications for identifying racial/ethnic disparities among U.S. reproductive-aged women

06 April

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PS

Perry Sheffield,PhD

Assistant Professor
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Departments of Pediatrics and Environmental Medicine and Public Health
OS-2: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Pregnant Women: Science/Solutions
Session Chair

Presentation title: Research Strategies for understanding and acting to protect pregnant women and children’s health in a changing climate

06 April

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KT

Kimberly Thigpen Tart,JD,MPH

Program Analyst
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
OS-2: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Pregnant Women: Science/Solutions

Presentation title: Tools, resources, and policies aimed at protecting children’s health from climate change

06 April

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Paul Winchester,MD

Professor of Clinical Pediatrics
Riley Children's Hospital
OS-3: Will Rising Herbicide Use in the Midwest Raise Reproductive Risks?

Presentation title: Birth center and science challenges

06 April

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HB

Heather Brumberg,MD,MPH,FAAP

OS-5: Environmental Influences on Brain Development

Presentation title: Poor Brains: Poverty, Preterm Birth and Long-Term Outcomes

06 April

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SS

Shetal Shah,MD

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
New York Medical College
OS54: Environmental Influences on Brain Development

Presentation title: Poor Brains Growing Up: Impact and Policy Implications

06 April

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YA

Yuko Arita,PhD

Senior Research Associate
Winthrop University Hospital
OS-5: Environmental Influences on Brain Development

Presentation title: Pentachlorobenzene Increases Bacteria-stimulated Cytokine Production in the Placenta

06 April

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Morgan Peltier,PhD

Associate Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
SUNY Stony brook University and Winthrop University Hospital
OS-5: Environmental Influences on Brain Development

Presentation title: Effect of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Congeners on placental Cytokines Productions

06 April

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HL

Hai-Wei Liang

Institute of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, College of Medicine
National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan
COS-1: Health Disparities

Presentation title: Association of birth outcomes with prenatal exposure to parabens

06 April

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JB

Julia Brody

Executive Director
Silent Spring Institute
OS-4: Early Life Exposures and Cancer: Science and Systems Change

Presentation title: Early Life Exposures to Environmental Contaminants that Contribute to Cancer: A Review of Recent Research

06 April

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MJ

Molly Jacobs,MPH

Senior Research Associate
Lowell Center for Sustainable Production University of Massachusetts, Lowell
OS-4: Early Life Exposures and Cancer: Science and Systems Change

Presentation title: Scaling the evaluation and adoption of safer chemicals and technologies: science and policy needs and opportunities

06 April

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RE

Ruth Etzel,MD,PhD

Director
Office of Children's Health Protection; US Environmental Protection Agency
OS-4: Early Life Exposures and Cancer: Science and Systems Change

Presentation title: Childhood Cancer Risks and Trends: What We Know and Don’t Know

OS-6: Elimination of childhood lead poisoning: a renewed federal strategy

Presentation title: A Renewed Federal Strategy to Eliminate Harmful Lead Exposure: Past, Present, and Future

06 April

06 April

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Sandra Howard

Senior Environmental Health Advisor
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, US Department of Health and Human Services
OS-6: Elimination of childhood lead poisoning: a renewed federal strategy

Presentation title: Federal Collaborative Efforts to Prevent Childhood Lead Exposures – The President’s Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children

06 April

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Abby Mutic,MSN,CNM

Certified Nurse-Midwife, Children’s Environmental Health Center Outreach Coordinator
Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
OS-7: Maternal-Child Health, the Environment, and the Microbiome

Presentation title: The microbiome and environmental chemicals

07 April

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Jeannie Rodriguez,PhD,MSN

Assistant Professor
Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
OS-7: Maternal-Child Health, the Environment, and the Microbiome

Presentation title: Gut/brain interaction

07 April

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Nicole Carlson,PhD,CNM

Assistant Professo
Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
OS-7: Maternal-Child Health, the Environment, and the Microbiome

Presentation title: The microbiome and pregnancy

07 April

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Erin P. Ferranti,PhD,MPH

Assistant Professor
Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
OS-7: Maternal-Child Health, the Environment, and the Microbiome

Presentation title: The microbiome and maternal obesity

07 April

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JL

Juleen Lam,MH,MHS,PhD

Associate Research Scientist
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences University of California, San Francisco
OS-8: Making Science-based Decisions in Children's Environmental Health

Presentation title: Systematic review in the environmental health sciences: an application to policy-making on formaldehyde and asthma

07 April

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Carol Kwiatkowski,PhD

Executive Director
The Endocrine Disruption Exchange (TEDX)
OS-8: Making Science-based Decisions in Children's Environmental Health

Presentation title: Systematic review in the environmental health sciences: an application to developmental BPA exposure and hyperactivity

07 April

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LL

Leanna Anna Lockwood

Interior Designer
Fashion Institute of Technology
COS-3: Persistent organic pollutants & Plastic Additives

Presentation title: Material Health in Early Childhood Learning Environments

07 April

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Erin S. Ihde,MA,CCRP

Project Manager, Environmental Research
Hackensack University Medical Center/Deirdre Imus Environmental Health Center

06 April

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TT

Talia Marie Torres

Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education/CUNY School of Medicine

06 April

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JP

Jerome Paulson,MD

Emeritus Professor
Milken School of Public Health, The George Washington Universiry

07 April

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PS

Peggy Shepard

Executive Director
WE ACT for Environmental Justice

07 April

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MM

Mark Magana

President & CEO
GreenLatinos

07 April

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SH

Sarah Howard,MS

National Coordinator of the Diabetes/Obesity Working Group
Collaborative on Health and the Environment

06 April

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MS

Maureen Swanson

Director, Healthy Children Project
Learning Disabilities Association of America
COS-4: Heavy Metals

Presentation title: The TENDR Lead Initiative: Forging new alliances to end childhood lead exposures

07 April

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Nica Louie,MS

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
COS-3: Persistent Organic Pollutants & Plastic Additives
Session Moderator

07 April

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Leyla McCurdy,MPH

Health and Environment Consulting
COS-1: Health Disparities
Session Moderator

06 April

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KG

Kimberly Gray,PhD

National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences
COS-2: Hot Topics in Children's Environmental Health
Session Moderator

06 April

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BA

Brenda Afzal,MS,RN

Board Member
CEHN
COS-4: Heavy Metals
Session Moderator

07 April

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SA

Samantha Ahdoot,MD

Pediatrician
OS-2: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Pregnant Women: Science/Solutions

Presentation title: TBD

06 April

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JB

John Balbus,MD,MPH

Senior Advisor for Public Health Director
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIEHS-WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Sciences
OS-2: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Pregnant Women: Science/Solutions
Moderator

06 April

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Andres Cardenas,PhD,MPH

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

06 April

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Angela Hackel,MA

Director, Program Implementation and Coordination Division, Office of the Administrator
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
OS-6: Elimination of Childhood Lead Poisoning: A Renewed Federal Strategy

Presentation: Stakeholder Engagement for a Federal Lead Strategy

06 April

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Michael Firestone,PhD

Health Scientist
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
OS-6: Elimination of Childhood Lead Poisoning: A Renewed Federal Strategy

Presentation: Drafting A Federal Lead Strategy

06 April

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Lt.Kimberly Smith

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
OS-6: Elimination of Childhood Lead Poisoning: A Renewed Federal Strategy

Presentation: Stakeholder Engagement for a Federal Lead Strategy

06 April

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Elizabeth Haase,MD

Producer/Psychiatrist
Climate Changed LLC/Carson Tahoe RMC/UNR
Film Preview Thursday, April 6  7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

And Then The Climate Changed: A Documentary About the Future for our Kids

Preview followed by Discussion/Q&A period with Dr. Haase

06 April

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CROPP Cooperative

General
Organic Valley is the nation’s largest farmer-owned organic cooperative, and one of the worlds' largest organic consumer brands.
We are 1,800 farm families strong, and produce 40% of the organic milk sold in the United States. Member farm families in England, Canada and Australia help us grow around the world.
Organic Valley farmer/owners enjoy some of the world’s highest dairy pay prices, and world-class veterinary, agronomy and financial tools, designed especially for organic sustainability and profit.
Organic Valley also seeks organic egg, meat, soy, produce, and livestock feed producers.
With more than 25 years of experience, and a powerful position in today's competitive organic marketplace, you’re in good company when you farm with Organic Valley.

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Anonymous Friend of CEHN

General
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Emory Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing

General
The Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing offers undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral nursing programs. Graduates go on to become national and international leaders in patient care, public health, government, and education. Master’s degree graduates are qualified to seek certification as nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, and/or clinical nurse specialists. The school’s PhD program focuses on clinical research. Its DNP program offers two specialty tracks: health systems leadership and population health.

The school offers a dual undergraduate degree with several colleges, dual master’s degrees with public health and with Emory’s Laney Graduate School in bioethics as well as an accelerated BSN/MSN program for students with degrees in other fields who want to serve the community as advanced practice nurses.

In fiscal year 2016, the school received $15.1 million in research funding. U.S. News & World Report ranked the school’s graduate programs 4th overall, its nurse midwifery graduate program 15th, and its family nurse practitioner program 8th.
The school has 104 faculty, and students can learn from adjunct faculty at more than 500 clinical sites, including an alternative winter/spring break in five countries and a multiuniversity, multidisciplinary summer program with Georgia migrant farmworkers. The school has 7,092 alumni.
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Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Refreshment Break Sponsor
The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is an international leader in medical and scientific training, biomedical research, and patient care. It is the medical school for the Mount Sinai Health System, which includes seven hospital campuses, and has more than 5,000 faculty and nearly 2,000 students, residents and fellows. Our unwavering pursuit of intellectual exchange, breakthrough research, and multidisciplinary teamwork propels us ever forward in biomedical discoveries and advances. We pursue ideas that often challenge conventional wisdom to revolutionize the practice of medicine and produce dramatically better outcomes for patients. We make big, bold bets by investing in radical free thinkers and technology at the cutting edge.
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Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washinton University

Refreshment Break Sponsor
The Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University is “a 21st century center of global public health leadership,” tackling many of the world’s most pressing public health challenges with a focus on prevention of disease and promotion of wellness. From its Washington, D.C., base, the school is ideally located for collaboration with major U.S. and international health institutions and schools of public health to drive change. Originally established by GW in 1977 as the School of Public Health and Health Services, the Milken Institute School of Public Health is the result of a transformative $80-million gift from the Milken Institute, Milken Family Foundation and the Sumner M. Redstone Charitable Foundation. Today, more than 1,100 students from nearly every U.S. state and more than 40 nations pursue undergraduate, graduate and doctoral-level degrees in public health. The school also offers an online Master of Public Health, MPH@GW, which allows students to pursue their degree from anywhere in the world.
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National Institue of Environmental Health Sciences

Reception Sponsor
The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), located in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, is one of 27 research institutes and centers that comprise the National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The mission of the NIEHS is to discover how the environment affects people in order to promote healthier lives.

The NIEHS traces its roots to 1966, when the U.S. Surgeon General announced the establishment of the Division of Environmental Health Sciences within the NIH. In 1969, the division was elevated to full NIH institute status. Since then, the NIEHS has evolved to its present status as a world leader in environmental health sciences, with an impressive record of important scientific accomplishments and a proud history of institutional achievements and growth.

Today the NIEHS is expanding and accelerating its contributions to scientific knowledge of human health and the environment, and to the health and well-being of people everywhere.

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by 1U13ES028106-01 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

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Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit Program

The Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSUs) are a source of medical information and advice on environmental conditions that influence reproductive and children’s health.

PEHSUs are academically based, typically at university medical centers, and are located across the United States and Canada. These PEHSU form a network that is capable of responding to requests for information throughout North America and offering advice on prevention, diagnosis, management, and treatment of environmentally-related health effects in children.

Because environmental factors have a variety of impacts on the health of children and reproductive age adults, the PEHSU network has experts in pediatrics, allergy/immunology, neurodevelopment, toxicology, occupational and environmental medicine, nursing, reproductive health and other specialized areas.

PEHSU work with health care professionals, parents, schools and community groups, and others to provide information on protecting children and reproductive-age adults from environmental hazards. They also work with Federal, State, and local agencies to address children’s environmental health issues in homes, schools, and communities.

The basic services of the PEHSU network are: Community education and outreach; Training health professionals; Consultation and referral; and Program outreach materials (in English and Spanish).

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Congressional Briefing

What Science Says: How EPA Matters to Children's Health

10:00 AM 12:00 PM SVC (Senate Visitors Center) 212-10 (At the U.S. Capitol)

Legislative Briefing - What the Science Says:
How EPA Matters to Children’s Health

Program Summary
The briefing will explore the latest science on how environmental protections (air, water, chemicals) affect children’s health; review current policy proposals related to the EPA and what they mean for scientific research and children’s future health and development; and examine the benefits and costs of EPA regulations and programs that have been targeted for removal. Registration is required to attend; Brunch will be served. Please circulate this invitation and encourage your Congressional representatives and staff to attend.

Legislative briefing 2017 04 05.pdf Download Link
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On-Site Registration Open

05:00 PM 08:00 PM Capital View Foyer, 14th Floor

Check in to receive your name badge and any other registration materials.
Attendify Graphics Specs.pdf Download Link
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General Session

Welcome and Introduction

06:00 PM 06:10 PM Capital View Ballroom, 14th Floor

Speakers

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General Session

Opening Keynote Address - Protecting Our Children, Protecting Our Home, Protecting Our Planet: These are rights, not opinions

06:10 PM 07:20 PM Capital View Ballroom

Keynote Presenter:  Richard Jackson, MD, MPH
Moderator:  Nsedu Obot Witherspoon, MPH

The lives of children across the planet are increasingly endangered by environmental threats. Children possess fundamental rights to food, shelter, clean air and water, and safety. Research creates knowledge; as it analyzes nature and assesses policies, it must impel action—and Now. The time for disinterest and leisure is past.

Speakers

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Welcome Reception

07:20 PM 09:00 PM Capital View Foyer

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Walking/Running Group Meet Up

06:00 AM 07:00 AM Lobby

For attendees looking for early morning walking or running partners.
Running Trail Map.pdf Download Link
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On-Site Registration Open

07:00 AM 07:00 PM Capital View Foyer

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Continental Breakfast Available

07:30 AM 08:30 AM Capital View Foyer

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General Session

Welcome and Introduction

08:30 AM 08:45 AM Capital View Ballroom

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General Session

Keynote - Emerging Data Sources to Support Public Health Strategies on Environmental Health

08:45 AM 09:45 AM Capital View Ballroom

Keynote Presenter: Joshua Sharfstein, MD
Moderator: James Roberts, MD, MPH

Dr. Sharfstein will discuss how new sources of data from healthcare create new opportunities for rapid assessment, analysis, and evaluation of pediatric environmental health challenges. Taking advantage of these opportunities requires an understanding of the data, the law, and the ways public health departments and others can align strategies with specific measurable outcomes.

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Organized Oral Session
Parallel Session

OS-1: Novel methods for examining cumulative chemical exposures during pregnancy

10:00 AM 11:30 AM Potomac Salons AB

Session Chair: 
Ami Zota, ScD, MS, Milken School of Public Health, George Washington University

Session Background:
Prenatal exposures are critical to understanding the link between the environment and children’s health. This symposium will highlight emerging scientific findings for characterizing multiple environmental chemical exposures during pregnancy and their implications for the exposome and environmental health disparities.

Session Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this session, attendees will be able to:
  1. summarize current and emerging methods for characterizing exposure to multiple environmental chemicals during pregnancy;
  2. understand some of the biological consequences associated with multiple chemical exposures to the fetus;
  3. identify risk factors associated with greater exposure to multiple environmental chemicals.

Session Overview:
  • A novel method for calculating potency-weighted cumulative phthalates exposure with implications for identifying racial/ethnic disparities among U.S. reproductive-aged women - Julia R. Varshavsky, MPH
  • Co-exposure to multiple persistent endocrine disruptors during pregnancy in a ethnically diverse California overweight cohort - Suril Mehta, DrPH, MPH
  • Novel Chemicals Identified in Pregnant Women in Northern California using Non-targeted Analysis - Tracey J. Woodruff, PhD, MPH
  • Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) and OH-PBDE concentrations in maternal serum, fetal liver, and placenta, and associations with fetal cytochrome P450 gene expression - Ami Zota, ScD, MS

Speakers

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Organized Oral Session
Parallel Session

OS-2: Climate Impacts on Children and Pregnant Women: From Science to Solutions

10:00 AM 11:30 AM Potomac Salons CD

Session Chair: Perry Sheffield, PhD
Session Moderator:  John Balbus, MD, MPH


Session Background:
This session will review key findings for pregnant women and children of the U.S. Global Climate Research Program's "Climate and Health Assessment" report, and to explore tools and strategies to improve awareness, support research, and build health resilience against climate change’s impacts among these vulnerable life stages.

Session Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this session, attendees will be able to:
  1. Understand the exposure pathways through which climate change will affect the health of children and pregnant women.
  2. List at least 5–7 related impacts on the health of children and pregnant women.
  3. Locate and identify at least five research strategies, tools, resources, or policies aimed at protecting children’s health.

Session Overview:
  • Understanding and acting to protect pregnant women and children’s health in a changing climate - Perry Sheffield, PhD
  • Climate policy protects every child -  Samantha Ahdoot, MD, FAAP
  • Tools, resources, and policies aimed at protecting children’s health - Kimberly Thigpen Tart, JD, MPH


Speakers

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Refreshment Break

11:30 AM 11:45 AM Potomac Foyer

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Organized Oral Session
Parallel Session

OS-3: Will Rising Herbicide Use in the Midwest Raise Reproductive Risks?

11:45 AM 01:15 PM Potomac Salons AB

Session Chair:
Charles Benbrook, PhD, Benbrook Consulting Services

Session Background:

Weed species resistant to glyphosate herbicide are rapidly spreading in the Midwest. The seed industry has responded by developing new GE corn and soybean varieties resistant to up to eight herbicides, including 2,4-D and dicamba. These old phenoxy herbicides are linked to a suite of reproductive problems, birth defects, and heightened cancer risk.

Session Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this session, attendees will be able to:
  1. Locate and utilize data on trends in herbicide use in each Midwestern state, in order to identify possibly important changes in exposures.
  2. Access documents synthesizing the results of past research on linkages between herbicide use, reproductive problems, and birth defects.
  3. Track actions by state and federal regulatory agencies, farmers and farm organizations, and research institutions working to prevent an increase in adverse reproductive outcomes.

Session Overview:
  • Introduction to the Herbicides in the Midwest Project - James Roberts, MD, MPH
  • Trends in Herbicide Use and Exposures - Charles Benbrook, PhD
  • Insights from Past Research - Melissa Perry, ScD, MHS
  • Emerging Science and Birth Center Challenges - Paul Winchester, MD
  • Open Discussion


Speakers

Herbicide Use in the Midwest_all_slides.pdf Download Link
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Organized Oral Session
Parallel Session

OS-4: Early Life Exposures and Cancer: Science and Systems Change

11:45 AM 01:15 PM Potomac Salons CD

Session Chair:
Polly Hoppin, ScD, College of Health Sciences / Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, University of Massachussetts, Lowell

Session Background:

This session will examine the links between early life exposures to environmental contaminants and cancer, including trends in incidence and exposure research. The session will provide a framework for the primary prevention of cancer, including the scaling of safer alternatives development as a systems-based strategy for reducing cancer risk.

Session Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this session, attendees will be able to:
  1. identify important facts about childhood cancer rates and why they should be a subject of concern; 
  2. summarize what is known and not known about early life exposures to environmental contaminants relevant to cancer; 
  3. describe research and policy initiatives that are driving the development of safer chemicals, materials and technologies, and roles for researchers, health professionals and advocates in scaling promising solutions.

Session Overview:
  • Advancing a Primary Prevention Agenda for Cancer: Systems Change to Drive Exposure Reduction in Early Life - Polly Hoppin, ScD
  • Childhood Cancer Risks and Trends: What We Know and Don’t Know - Ruth Etzel, MD, PhD
  • Early Life Exposures to Environmental Contaminants that Contribute to Cancer: A Review of Recent Research - Julia Brody, PhD
  • Scaling the evaluation and adoption of safer chemicals and technologies: science and policy needs and opportunities - Molly Jacobs, MPH



Speakers

Polly slides.pdf Download Link
MJacobs CEHN Apr 6 2017.pdf Download Link
Brody_CEHN_April 2017.pdf Download Link
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Buffet Lunch

01:15 PM 02:00 PM Capital View Foyer

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Contributed Oral Presentations
Parallel Session

COS-1: Health Disparities

02:00 PM 03:30 PM Potomac Salons AB

Session Moderator: Leyla McCurdy, MPhil

Contributed Presentations:
  • Thirdhand smoke contamination in low- income housing - Penelope J E. Quintana, PhD, MPH
  • Is sitting the new smoking for Washington DC area youth? - Jennifer D. Roberts, DrPH, MPH
  • Association of birth outcomes with prenatal exposure to parabens - Hai Wei Liang
  • Parabens and Asthma Morbidity in Chidren with Asthma NHANES(2005-10) - Lesliam Quiros-Alcala, PhD, MS
  • Amerihealth Tablet Project: Reducing Asthma ER Visits  - Janet A. Phoenix, MD, MPH
  • Domoic Acid Neurotoxicity in Native American Children - Stacy Buckingham-Howes, PhD


Speakers

Phoenix_Tablet Intervention.pdf Download Link
Domoic Acid Neurotoxicity in Native American Children 3-31-16.pdf Download Link
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Contributed Oral Presentations
Parallel Session

COS-2: Hot Topics in Children's Environmental Health

02:00 PM 03:30 PM Potomac Salons CD

Session Moderator:  Kimberly Gray, PhD

Contributed Presentations:

  • Landscape Maintainance Equipment Emissions and Chidren's Health - Jamie L. Banks, PhD, MS
  • DNA methylation as a mediator of in utero exposures on risk of ALL - Jessica Ann Timms
  • Autoimmunity and Spina Bifida—Identification of Maternal Serum Biomarkers Associated with Neural Tube Defects, Richard H. Finnell, PhD
  • Scaling Factor Variability and Toxicokinetic Outcomes in Children - Elaina M. Kenyon, PhD, DABT
  • Reducing exposure to pesticides in California family child care homes - Kimberly Hazard
  • Environmental Public Health Systems: Protecting Health of All Children - Surili Patel, MS

Speakers

CEHN_PesticidesFamilyChildCare_KHazard.pdf Download Link
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Organized Oral Session
Parallel Session

OS-5: Environmental Influences on Brain Development

03:45 PM 05:15 PM Potomac Salons AB

Session Chair:
Cynthia F. Bearer, MD, PhD, FAAP

Session Background:

Poverty leads to various environmental exposures which can harm the developing brain. This session will explore how poverty leads to these exposures, how one target may be the placenta, which can then influence brain development.

Session Learning Objectives:
Upon completing this session, attendees will be able to:
  1. describe poverty;
  2. describe environmental exposures which are prevalent amongst people living in poverty;
  3. describe the influence of the placenta on brain development

Session Overview:
Often times, we look at environmental exposures one agent at a time. However, children living in poverty are exposed to a mixture of chemicals which in combination can cause greater harm than each chemical alone. This session will explore the impacts of those mixtures, the mechanisms by which they cause harm, and how one mechanism of harm maybe be through the placenta. Our session will start with two presentations on the exposures found in people living in poverty, and the mechanisms of those exposures. Our second two presentations will focus on specific exposures to the placenta and the mechanisms causing placental dysfunction. Each presentation will describe the impact of such exposures to the developing brain.

  • Poor Brains: Poverty, Preterm Birth and Long-Term Outcomes - Heather Brumberg, MD, MPH, FAAP
  • Poor Brains Growing Up: Impact and Policy Implications - Shetal Shah, MD
  • Pentachlorobenzene Increases Bacteria-stimulated Cytokine Production in the Placenta - Yuko Arita, PhD
  • Effect of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Congeners on placental Cytokines Productions - Morgan Peltier, PhD


Speakers

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Organized Oral Session
Parallel Session

OS-6: Elimination of childhood lead poisoning: a renewed federal strategy

03:45 PM 05:15 PM Potomac Salons CD

Session Chair:
Manthan Shah, PhD, MPH, Office of Children’s Health Protection at EPA

Session Background:
Childhood lead exposure is a persistent problem in the U.S. The President’s Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children is developing a new strategy to eliminate harmful childhood lead exposure and its associated health effects. Session participants have the opportunity to learn of the government’s progress and provide valuable input.

Session Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this session, attendees will be able to:
  1. describe the process for developing a federal lead strategy, including areas for public input.
  2. identify several short-term and long-term goals required to achieve the goal of eliminating lead poisoning in the US.

Session Overview:
Current status of harmful lead exposure and its associated health effects in US - Manthan Shah, PhD, MPH
A Renewed Federal Strategy to Eliminate Harmful Lead Exposure: Past, Present, and Future - Ruth Etzel, MD, PhD
Federal Collaborative Efforts to Prevent Childhood Lead Exposures – The President’s Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children - Sandra Howard
Stakeholder Engagement for a Federal Lead Strategy - Angela Hackel, MA and Lt. Kimberly Smith
Drafting a Federal Lead Stragegy - Michael Firestone, PhD


Speakers

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General Session

Closing Announcements

05:15 PM 05:30 PM Capital View Ballroom

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General Session

Poster Reception

05:30 PM 07:00 PM Capital View Foyer

Contributed Poster Presentations:

Gas-Powered Leaf Blower Sound and Impact on Children - Jamie L Banks, Ph.D, MS, Quiet Communities, Inc.

Air Pollutants and Ecological Conditions around Tribal Schools (US) - Nilla Barros, ORISE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

Flame retardant exposure and social behavior in preschoolers - Andres Cardenas, PhD, MPH as Presenting Author

Economic Value of Home-based Asthma Interventions - Kevin Chan, MBA, Green & Healthy Homes Initiative

The Reproductive Environmental Health Network - Ann Ferrero, MPH, Health Resources and Services Administration

Review of Non-Chemical Stressors in a Child’s Social Environment - Kathleen Hibbert, Ph.D, US Environmental Protection Agency

Exposure to Bisphenol A & Common Substitutes among Mothers & Newborns - Erin S. Ihde, MA, The Deirdre Imus Environmental Health Center®, Hackensack University Medical Center

Hazardous Safeguards - Elizabeth O'Nan, MS, Protect All Children's Environment

Consequences of Childhood Chemical Injury - Elizabeth O'Nan, MS, Protect All Children's Environment

Environmental Health Science Translational Research Framework - Kristi Pettibone, Ph.D, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Early Life Exposure and Obesity/Metabolic Disease in Childhood - Karin Russ, MS, RN, University of Maryland School of Nursing or Sarah Howard, MS, Collaborative on Health and the Environmental

NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: An Analysis of Neurodevelopmental Findings - Emily Szwiec, MPH, ASPPH Fellow hosted by the Environmental Protection Agency 

Environment, methylation and ALL risk: a Mendelian randomization study - Jessica Ann Timms, Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, U.K.

Levels of Metals in Nails of Children Living near Coal Burning Plants - Lindsay Koloff Tompkins, MS, University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences

Associations of Exposure to Lead Hazards Among NYC Residents - Talia Marie Torres, MS Student, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education/CUNY School of Medicine

Association Between Organophosphate Pesticides and Children's Health - Yi-Ru Wang, Institute of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, National Yang-Ming University

Partnering with community stakeholders to address health disparities - Haguerenesh Woldeyohannes, Emory/C-CHEM2 Project






Speakers

Poster Abstracts.pdf Download Link
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Junior Investigator Poster Award Presentations

06:50 PM 07:00 PM Capital View Foyer

Awards presented to top junior investigator poster presenters.
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General Session

Short Film - "And Then The Climate Changed”: A Documentary About The Future For Our Kids

07:00 PM 08:00 PM Capital View Ballroom

A special film preview viewing and discussion with Producer Dr. Elizabeth Haase
Moderator: Brenda Afzal, MS, RN

And Then The Climate Changed is a documentary under development that explores what psychological traits and skills will allow children to survive their climate-changed future. It is the story of two worried moms, a psychiatrist and an environmentalist, who can see what is coming and want to know what to do to prepare their children now. Through interviews with national leaders such as Jeff Sachs, Joe Lieberman, Karina Gore and others who have led the charge on global warming and its impacts, they discover one set of answers. The question is, are the answers going to work?

This special evening film screening and discussion session will address the impacts of climate change to children's mental health, an important contributor to children's overall health and well-being. After the film showing, Dr. Elizabeth Haase will discuss what cognitive science and climate communications experts know about what really makes for behavioral change and how this applies to the challenge of living sustainably that we and our children are facing together.




Speakers

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Walking/Running Group Meet Up

06:00 AM 07:00 AM Lobby

For attendees looking for early morning walking or running partners.
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On-Site Registration Open

07:00 AM 04:00 PM Capital View Foyer

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Continental Breakfast Available

07:30 AM 08:30 AM Capital View Foyer

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Optional Policy Discussion Breakfast--sign up required at registration

07:30 AM 08:30 AM Capital View Salon Foyer 2

Please join fellow participants over breakfast to discuss the current political climate around children's environmental health. This will be an open discussion where all participants have the opportunity to hear about challenges and opportunities as well as to share strategies and related priorities in moving forward.

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General Session

Welcome, Morning Announcements

08:30 AM 08:45 AM Capital View Ballroom

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General Session

Keynote - Environmental Influences of Child Health Outcomes

08:45 AM 09:45 AM Capital View Ballroom

Keynote Presenter:  Matthew Gillman, MD, SM
Moderator:  Cynthia Bearer, MD, PhD, FAAP

Understanding the effects of abroad array of early environmental exposures on child health and development is a priority for the National Institutes of Health. To advance knowledge in this area, NIH has launched a seven-year initiative called the Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) program. ECHO is designed to capitalize on existing participant populations, and support approaches that can evolve with the science and take advantage of the growing number of clinical research networks and technological advances.
ECHO will support multiple, synergistic, longitudinal studies using existing cohorts to investigate effects of environmental exposures — including physical, chemical, biological, social, behavioral, natural and built environments — on child health and development.

An additional, but significant, element is an IDeA States Pediatric Clinical Trials Network. This network also will leverage the existing IDeA infrastructure by embedding clinical trials experts at IDeA state locations and facilitating their partnership with other academic institutions. This national network for pediatric research could help address access gaps for rural children by leveraging the infrastructure at existing IDeA state centers.

Speakers

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Organized Oral Session
Parallel Session

OS-7: Maternal-Child Health, the Environment, and the Microbiome

10:00 AM 11:30 AM Potomac Salons AB

Session Chair:
Linda McCauley, PhD, RN, FAAN, FAAOHN, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University

Session Background:
This presentation will review the interplay between environmental chemical exposures, the human microbiome, pregnancy, maternal obesity, and their impacts on maternal-child health and development.

Session Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this session, attendees will be able to:
  1. discuss how environmental chemical exposures influence the composition and development of the microbiome during pregnancy and early childhood;
  2. describe the role of the microbiome and the gut brain axis and its impact on child neurological development;
  3. describe the bidirectional influence of the microbiome on obesity in pregnancy.

Session Overview:
  • The microbiome and environmental chemicals - Abby Mutic, MSN, CNM
  • Gut/brain interaction - Jeannie Rodriguez, PhD, MSN
  • The microbiome and pregnancy - Nicole Carlson, PhD, CNM
  • The microbiome and maternal obesity - Erin P. Ferranti, PhD, MPH, RN, FAHA


Speakers

Emory_CEHN_COTC.PDF Download Link
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Organized Oral Session
Parallel Session

OS-8: Making science-based decisions in children’s environmental health

10:00 AM 11:30 AM Potomac Salons CD

Session Chair:
Tracy J. Woodruff, PhD, MPH, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco

Session Background:
Our ability to transparently integrate scientific evidence into a concise and reproducible “bottom line” about a chemical’s toxicity is essential to moving from science to better children’s health outcomes. This panel will discuss how systematic review methods are addressing this critical challenge in children’s environmental health.

Session Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this session, attendees will be able to:
  1. understand and access novel systematic review methods for synthesizing and evaluating children’s environmental health research, including case study examples of the methodology;
  2. identify how these methods can speed translation of the science linking exposure to environmental chemicals and children’s health outcomes to improve public policy;
  3. describe new software tools available to increase the usability and application of these methods.

Session Overview:
  • Systematic review in the environmental health sciences: history and future - Tracy J Woodruff, PhD, MPH
  • Systematic review in the environmental health sciences: current tools and software advances - Vickie R. Walker
  • Systematic review in the environmental health sciences: an application to policy-making on formaldehyde and asthma - Juleen Lam, MH, MHS, PhD
  • Systematic review in the environmental health sciences: an application to developmental BPA exposure and hyperactivity - Carol Kwiatkowski, PhD

Speakers

Walker_CEHN 04062017.pdf Download Link
WOODRUFF slides.pdf Download Link
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Refreshment Break

11:30 AM 11:45 AM Potomac Foyer

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Contributed Oral Presentations
Parallel Session

COS-3: Persistent Organic Pollutants & Plastic Additives

11:45 AM 01:15 PM Potomac Salons AB

Session Moderator: Nica Louie, MS


Contributed Presentations:
  • Persistent organic pollutants in breast milk and dietary history - Eunha Hoh, PhD, MS
  • Toddlers exposure to Brominated and Phosphorus Flame Retardants - Eva J. Sugeng, MSc
  • Phthalates and metabolic syndrome in U.S. adolescents (NHANES 2003-10) - Symielle A. Gaston, PhD, MPH
  • Prenatal EDC exposures and biomarkers of the chronic stress response - Laura Romano, MPH
  • Identifying water sources at risk of PFAS contamination in Washington - Elmer Diaz, MS
  • Material Health in Early Childhood Learning Environments - Leanna Anna Lockwood


Speakers

EDiaz CEHN_April 2017.pdf Download Link
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Contributed Oral Presentations
Parallel Session

COS-4: Heavy Metals

11:45 AM 01:15 PM Potomac Salons CD

Session Moderator: Brenda Afzal, MS, RN

Contributed Presentations:
  • Fly Ash Exposure and Social Competence in Children Aged 6 to 14 - Kristina M. Zierold, PhD, MS
  • Health of children living near coal ash - Clara G. Sears, MS
  • Lead Content of Sindoor, a Hindu Religious Powder and Cosmetic - Manthan Shah, PhD, MPH
  • Community-driven methods to evaluate exposures from a lead smelter - Jill Johnston, PhD
  • The TENDR lead initiative: Forging new alliances to end childhood lead exposures - Maureen Swanson, MPA

Speakers

The biomonitoring and health outcome of students in gold mine vicinity-2.pdf Download Link
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Buffet Lunch

01:15 PM 02:00 PM Capital View Foyer

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General Session

Research to Action

02:00 PM 04:00 PM Capital View Ballroom

Session Moderator:
Mark Magaña, GreenLatinos

Session Overview:
This policy implications session is a distinguishing feature of CEHN’s research conferences--a chance for participants to pull together their thoughts on the latest research findings and to discuss what is actionable and how to move forward.
For this 2-hour session our expert panel will provide remarks on translating research into effective protective policy, informed health care practice, and successful systems change.

Panelists / Viewpoints offered:
How to use scientific evidence to change clinical and policy practice to prevent further exposures - Tracey Woodruff, PhD, MPH
How Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSUs) are helping to inform clinical care - Jerome A. Paulson, MD  
Successful community collaborations in New York - Peggy Shepard

Speakers

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General Session

Wrap Up and Closing Remarks

04:00 PM 04:30 PM Capital View Ballroom

Speakers